Miltons Prosody: An Examination of the Rules of the Blank Verse in Miltons Later Poems Robert Seymour Bridges

ISBN: 9781408628270

Published: October 1st 2007

Paperback

92 pages


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Miltons Prosody: An Examination of the Rules of the Blank Verse in Miltons Later Poems  by  Robert Seymour Bridges

Miltons Prosody: An Examination of the Rules of the Blank Verse in Miltons Later Poems by Robert Seymour Bridges
October 1st 2007 | Paperback | PDF, EPUB, FB2, DjVu, AUDIO, mp3, ZIP | 92 pages | ISBN: 9781408628270 | 10.45 Mb

MiltonS Prosody: An Examination Of The Rules Of The Blank Verse In MiltonS Later Poems - 1894 - INTRODUCION - THE basis of this book is a tract which I wrote five years ago on the rules of Miltons verse in Paradise Lost this is now reprinted withMoreMiltonS Prosody: An Examination Of The Rules Of The Blank Verse In MiltonS Later Poems - 1894 - INTRODUCION - THE basis of this book is a tract which I wrote five years ago on the rules of Miltons verse in Paradise Lost this is now reprinted with corrections. It is followed by an examination of liltons subsequent verse, a most interesting development of which is found in Samson Apnisles.

This part of the book is rewritten from a tract printed in 1889. And to these two tracts I now add some appendices in elucidation of a few questions arisen in the text. My intention throughout has been confined to hf iltons verse, and to the mere structure of that I have done little more than tabulate the simplest facts and while on the one side of the subject I have refrained from attempting to give any explanation of the laws of English prosody, I have on the other side avoided as far as possible entering even upon the borderland between prosody and poetry.

The first of these limitations is desirable until the metrical facts are all got together and there is still much more omitted than included in my rudimentary analysis. But to have made the distinctions which I have purposely avoided would have implied a very different task from what I set myself, and one, which, had I been disposed to devote time to it, I could not have accomplished. Indeed, it was not until after I despaired of persuading others more competent than myself to execute the work, that I undertook what I have done.

I have neither the faculty nor the habits which are the first requisites in one who would compile a grammar of any sort nor is that kind of labour congenial to my taste the evidences of which in this book, itsinaccuracies and oversights, I preengage the reader to excuse. And since classification at its best is often but mere convenience, I may hope that my method is not unfit for my definite and limited purpose.

. As the conditions under which the first tract was published forbade its swelling into a readable form, I give here a synopsis of it, a glance at which may, I hope, make its arrangement of rules and exceptions very easy to follow. SYNOPSIS OF FIRST TRACT, pp. 7-25. A REGULAR blank verse being first defined as obeying three cunditions - I In the number of syllables, which is ten.

2 In the number of stresses, which is five. 3 In the position of stresses, which is on the even syllables. Then its variations are tabulated under these same three heads that is, Exceptions - I To the number of syllables being ten, pp. 7-16. 2 To the number of stresses being five, pp. 17-19. 3 To the stresses falling on the even syllables, pp. 19-21. A chapter on the caesura or break of the verse, pp. 23-25. ON THE ELEMENTS OF MILTONS BLANK VERSE IN PARADISE LOST. The typical verse has 1 ten syllables, 2 with five stresses, 3 in rising rhythm i. e. with the stresses on the even syllables.

See Ap. G. SUPERNUMERARY SYLLABLES. A. Extrametrical syllables. I. At end of line. An extra, syllable sometimes occurs at the end of the line, more rarely in Milton than in most writers, e. g. I Of rebel Angels, by whose aid aspi ring. i. 38 and ex. 23 95. Sometimes there are two such syllables, e. g. 2 Imbued, bring to their sweetness no sati ety. viii. z 16. 3 For solitude sometimes is best soci ety.

ix. 249. See p. 41. 11. In other parts of the line. In Shakespeare it is common to find an analogous syllable in the midstof the line. See Ap. A...



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